ESPN’s Joe Tessitore Throws Shade At Le’Veon Bell By Bringing Up James Connor Surviving Cancer

(Photo by Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images)

ESPN has a new play-by-play guy for Monday Night Football by the name of Joe Tessitore. While the early reviews on him have been mostly positive, Tessitore made a questionable comment during the Steelers-Bucs game that has people calling him out for it.

When discussing the Le’Veon Bell’s holdout with color analyst Jason Witten, Tessitore brought up the fact that RB playing in place of Bell, James Connor, is a cancer survivor, who makes much less than Bell:

Booger McFarland, also a part of the Monday Night Football crew as a sidelines analyst, quickly jumped to the aid of Bell, whose holdout now continues into Week 4 of the NFL season.

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